Buy Betamethasone % Cream / Ointment 30g Online | My Pharmacy.Betamethasone for skin: medicine used to treat eczema, contact dermatitis and psoriasis - NHS

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Betamethasone in uk. Betamethasone 0.1% Cream & Ointment



  They are commonly prescribed by many of the Oral. Medicine departments in the United Kingdom. How do I use Betamethasone soluble tablets? The British Society for Paediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes (BSPED) has developed a Paediatric Steroid Treatment Card which should be issued to children with. Betamethasone % cream or ointment can be ordered from our UK registered online prescribing service. Simply complete an online medical questionnaire as part.     ❾-50%}

 

Betamethasone in uk. Betamethasone 0.1% Cream / Ointment



    You should thoroughly wash and dry your hands before applying any topical cream, ointment, or lotion. The active ingredient Betamethasone is available in a wide variety of preparations. Steroid Emergency Card In adults: Steroid Emergency Cards should be issued to patients with adrenal insufficiency and steroid dependence for whom missed doses, illness, or surgery puts them at risk of adrenal crisis. This helps to avoid side effects. Betamethasone cream is an unbranded generic version of Betnovate and both contain the same active ingredient. Dr Fox does not prescribe for women who are pregnant or breastfeeding. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you're taking any other medicines, including herbal medicines, vitamins or supplements.

Topical corticosteroids should be applied in sufficient quantity to cover the affected areas. The length of cream or ointment expelled from a tube may be used to specify the quantity to be applied to a given area of skin. This length can be measured in terms of a fingertip unit the distance from the tip of the adult index finger to the first crease. Several minutes should elapse between application of topical corticosteroids and emollients. Manufacturer advises cleanse and dry skin prior to plaster application.

Plaster may be cut to fit area to be treated. The potency of each topical corticosteroid should be included on the label with the directions for use. The label should be attached to the container for example, the tube rather than the outer packaging. If systemic absorption occurs following intranasal use, side-effects applicable to systemic corticosteroids may apply. A patient information leaflet should be supplied to every patient when a systemic corticosteroid is prescribed. Patients should especially be advised of potential side-effects including adrenal suppression, immunosuppression, and psychiatric reactions for further details, see Side-effects, further information.

Steroid Treatment Cards should be issued where appropriate to support communication of the risks associated with treatment and to record details of the prescriber, drug, dosage, and duration of treatment. NHS Trusts can order supplies via the online ordering portal. Steroid Emergency Cards should be issued to patients with adrenal insufficiency and steroid dependence for whom missed doses, illness, or surgery puts them at risk of adrenal crisis.

The Royal College of Physicians and the Society for Endocrinology advise that the following patients are considered at risk of adrenal insufficiency and should be given a Steroid Emergency Card:. If a patient is using topical corticosteroids of different potencies, the patient should be told when to use each corticosteroid.

Patients and their carers should be reassured that side effects such as skin thinning and systemic effects rarely occur when topical corticosteroids are used appropriately. If systemic absorption occurs following topical and local use, side-effects applicable to systemic corticosteroids may apply.

Patient counselling is advised for betamethasone cream, ointment, scalp application and foam application. Navigate to section Drug action Indications and dose Unlicensed use Important safety information Contra-indications Cautions Interactions Side-effects Pregnancy Breast feeding Hepatic impairment Renal impairment Monitoring requirements Effect on laboratory tests Treatment cessation Directions for administration Prescribing and dispensing information Patient and carer advice Profession specific information Medicinal forms Related treatment summaries Other drugs in class.

Interactions View interactions for betamethasone. Medicinal forms and pricing There can be variation in the licensing of different medicines containing the same drug.

Forms available from special-order manufacturers include: cream, ointment. Drug action Drug action For betamethasone Betamethasone has very high glucocorticoid activity and insignificant mineralocorticoid activity. Child Apply every 1—2 hours until controlled then reduce frequency. Adult Apply every 1—2 hours until controlled then reduce frequency. These treatments should be used twice daily for no longer than a week.

Before using Betamethasone cream or ointment you should read the following warnings, in order to make sure that this is the correct treatment for you. If you have recently taken, or are currently taking any other medications, you should tell your doctor before beginning a treatment of Betamethasone.

You should thoroughly wash and dry your hands before applying any topical cream, ointment, or lotion.

You should also clean and dry the affected area. Apply a small amount of treatment to the area and rub in gently up to three times a day. The affected area should not be bandaged or covered in any way unless you have been specifically advised to by a medical professional. Unless your affliction is present on your hands, always wash them after use.

If applying any Betamethasone product to your face, take care to not get any in your eyes as this can cause or worsen glaucoma. If you do get any in your eyes clean them immediately with lots of water. If, after two weeks, your condition has not improved or has worsened you should speak with your doctor.

Side effects are uncommon when using Betamethasone cream or ointment, however some potential side effects can include:. If you have any concerns regarding any of the information listed above, or you experience a side effect no on this list, then cease usage and speak to your doctor as soon as possible. Side effects are uncommon when using Betamethasone cream, however some potential side effects can include:. If you have any concerns regarding any of the information listed above, or you experience a side effect no on this list, then cease usage and speak to your doctor as soon as possible.

Patient information leaflet. Close Search. Betamethasone 0. Yes No. You should see a doctor about new rashes, worsening rashes, and rashes not responding to treatment. Please describe the area that needs treatment including its location on the body and appearance. Accepted file types: jpg, png, Max. This is compulsory, a picture will help our healthcare team to make an appropriate decision about your treatment. You should see your doctor if your condition does not improve within 7 days or worsening rashes, and rashes not responding to treatment.

Topical Steroids should not be applied under a bandage or to broken skin. Acne Rosacea Itching around the genitals or anus Perioral dermatitis spotty red rash around your mouth Infected skin unless the infection is being treated with an anti-infective medicine at the same time Itchy skin where there is no inflammation.

Ritonavir Itraconazole. You are allergic to any topical steroids or any other ingredients contained in the medication. You have used topical steroids before and suffered serious side effects. You have psoriasis, as your doctor will need to see you more often.

You will read the patient information leaflet provided with your medication or by following the relevant link The treatment is solely for your own use All the information you have provided is accurate. You understand our prescribers can only base decisions on the information provided and that incorrect information can be detrimental to your health. We need to ensure that this medicine is suitable for the person it is intended for.

I consent to receive treatment from My Pharmacy, and confirm that I have the mental capacity to do so. The decision about the treatment is for both the patient and the prescriber to consider, however, the final decision will always rest with the prescriber and is subject to approval.

If your doctor has prescribed it to treat very severe nappy rash, ask them how much to use and how long to use it for.

Skin lotions can dry onto your clothes and bedding. You will usually use the lotion twice a day. You can use it once a day or less often when your condition improves. If you have washed your hair, dry it properly before using the scalp lotion.

You can use the foam up to twice a day. Medicated plasters are for small areas of skin and thickened skin affected by psoriasis. Do not reuse plasters. Use a new plaster on the same patch of skin every 24 hours. Wait at least 30 minutes between taking off an old plaster and putting on a new one. Do not get the plaster wet. It's best to have a shower or bath after taking off the old plaster and before putting on a new one. Most people only need to use betamethasone skin treatments for a short time.

Stop as soon as your skin is better. Sometimes you only need to use the skin treatments for a few days. If you're using the scalp foam, or are using betamethasone on your face, ask your doctor or pharmacist how long to use it for.

If you're using the cream, ointment or lotion, tell your doctor if your skin gets worse or does not improve within 2 to 4 weeks or 5 days for a child. Children must not use the scalp application or foam for more than 5 to 7 days follow the instructions that come with the medicine. Using more than the recommended amount of your betamethasone skin treatment is unlikely to harm you. If you forget to use your betamethasone skin treatment, do not worry. Use it as soon as you remember unless it's nearly time for your next dose.

In this case, skip the missed dose and apply the next one at the usual time. Betamethasone skin treatments are unlikely to cause any side effects if you follow the instructions. You're more likely to have side effects if you use it on large areas of skin for long periods of time, or on sensitive skin areas such as the face, or under dressings or nappies.

Some people get a burning or stinging feeling for a few minutes when they put betamethasone on their skin. This stops happening after you've been using it for a few days. Serious side effects are rare. They happen to less than 1 in 10, people who use betamethasone skin treatments.

You're more likely to have a serious side effect if you use betamethasone on a large area of skin for a long time. Using betamethasone for a long time can make your skin thinner or cause stretch marks. Stretch marks are likely to be permanent, but they usually fade over time. In very rare cases, using betamethasone for a long time can slow the normal growth of children and teenagers.

Your child's doctor will monitor their height and weight carefully if they need to use this medicine often. This will help them to notice if your child's growth is being affected and they can change the treatment if needed. Talk to your doctor if you're worried.

They will be able to explain the benefits and risks of your child using betamethasone. It happens rarely, but it is possible to have a serious allergic reaction anaphylaxis to betamethasone. These are not all the side effects of betamethasone. For a full list, see the leaflet inside your medicine packet. Betamethasone is not usually recommended for use when pregnant. A dermatologist skin care specialist may prescribe it if they feel the benefits outweigh the risks.

The paraffin may be absorbed on clothing and bedding, which should be washed regularly to reduce fire risk. Keep away from naked flames. Rarely other ingredients in Betnovate may cause skin reactions. If eczema worsens when using Betnovate, stop the treatment and consult your GP or skin specialist.

Overusing Betnovate on the skin may cause skin thinning and stretch marks. This is much more of a problem if using steroids as tablets or injections for conditions other than eczema. Betnovate should be used for the shortest time necessary to control the eczema and not for longer than 4 weeks at a time.

If eczema is not settling consult your GP or skin specialist. Steroid tablet use has been linked with development of cataracts and other problems in the eyes.

This is extremely unlikely with Betnovate but if you develop any blurring of vision consult your GP.

Please contact us if you require a specific brand. Arrives as quickly as the next working day in discreet packaging. Our team of doctors and pharmacists, and our support staff, are all UK-based. We're on hand to offer free support and advice by email and telephone Mon - Fri - This treatment requires an online consultation for review by our medical team.

The decision to supply the specific treatment and quantity requested will be based on whether our medical team are satisfied that it will be safe, appropriate, and effective. Betamethasone cream and ointment are effective topical treatments for inflamed skin.

Using the active ingredient known as betamethasone, the cream will reduce any itching, inflammation and redness associated with common skin conditions such as:.

Betamethasone cream is an unbranded generic version of Betnovate and both contain the same active ingredient. Betamethasone falls into the category of topical corticosteroid or topical steroids. Topical steroids such as this product should be used in addition to your usual moisturiser in order to treat and manage your skin condition effectively. While this treatment is not a cure for your skin condition, it will help you to manage the symptoms, drastically improving your quality of life.

Using betamethasone has been proven to treat afflictions all throughout the body, from your scalp, all the way to the soles of your feet. Inflammation can arise for a number of reasons, usually as a result of a skin irritant or allergic reaction. When your body detects such an inflammation it will release various chemicals which cause your blood vessels to widen, creating the swollen, itchy, redness, known as inflammation.

Once Betamethasone has been topically applied it will begin to work directly within your cells, decreasing the inflammatory chemicals and reducing the swelling and redness associated with your skin condition. The cream can also be used for other inflammations as well, such as allergies or irritants, bodily reactions to insect bites and stings, as well as rashes caused by local problems.

The active ingredient Betamethasone is available in a wide variety of preparations. If your skin is moist or weeping then you will usually be prescribed Betamethasone cream.

If your skin is dry then an ointment might be a more appropriate treatment as it has a greasier texture. And for larger areas, a lotion could be a better choice. Betamethasone is also available as a scalp treatment.

The ingredient Betamethasone can be combined with other beneficial ingredients to deliver antibacterial, antibiotic, and antifungal treatments. Some of these include Betnovate-C and Fucibet. The combined formulas can be used to treat inflammation in conjunction with infections. These treatments will usually be prescribed for short term use if you are suffering from an infection. These treatments should be used twice daily for no longer than a week. Before using Betamethasone cream or ointment you should read the following warnings, in order to make sure that this is the correct treatment for you.

If you have recently taken, or are currently taking any other medications, you should tell your doctor before beginning a treatment of Betamethasone. You should thoroughly wash and dry your hands before applying any topical cream, ointment, or lotion. You should also clean and dry the affected area.

Apply a small amount of treatment to the area and rub in gently up to three times a day. The affected area should not be bandaged or covered in any way unless you have been specifically advised to by a medical professional. Unless your affliction is present on your hands, always wash them after use.

If applying any Betamethasone product to your face, take care to not get any in your eyes as this can cause or worsen glaucoma. If you do get any in your eyes clean them immediately with lots of water. If, after two weeks, your condition has not improved or has worsened you should speak with your doctor. Side effects are uncommon when using Betamethasone cream or ointment, however some potential side effects can include:.

If you have any concerns regarding any of the information listed above, or you experience a side effect no on this list, then cease usage and speak to your doctor as soon as possible. Chris Newbury first joined The Independent Pharmacy as a Pharmacist Independent Prescriber in and has had an instrumental role in growing the service in the years since. Scott is one of the two founders of The Independent Pharmacy.

He is a registered pharmacist and the registered manager of our service with the CQC. Or browse all treatments or conditions. Calculating delivery estimate. Free support and advice We're on hand to offer free support and advice by email and telephone Mon - Fri - Betamethasone 0. Consultation required? Using the active ingredient known as betamethasone, the cream will reduce any itching, inflammation and redness associated with common skin conditions such as: Eczema Psoriasis Dermatitis Betamethasone cream is an unbranded generic version of Betnovate and both contain the same active ingredient.

How does Betamethasone work? Alternatives to Betamethasone The ingredient Betamethasone can be combined with other beneficial ingredients to deliver antibacterial, antibiotic, and antifungal treatments. Non-prescription alternatives for eczema can include; Moisturisers and emollients Bath and Shower Gels Cotton Gloves To keep from scratching Antihistamine tablets To ease the itching Sources Betamethasone 0.

Betamethasone cream should not be used in certain circumstances, including: If you are allergic to any of the ingredients listed above. If you are treating a child under 1 year old.

Betamethasone should not be applied to: Itchy areas without inflammation The anal area unless specified by the doctor The genital area unless specified by the doctor Special care should be taken when using Betamethasone cream if: You suffer from an allergic reaction ie itchy skin and redness after initial use. You are applying the cream to a leg ulcer. You must apply the cream to your face where the skin is thinner. You get any cream in your eyes, rinse immediately.

You have psoriasis your doctor may want to review your progress at regular interviews in order to assess continued treatment. How it works. Find the ideal treatment for your condition We stock over medicines to treat over 83 conditions. Complete a short online consultation Your answers will be reviewed by a qualified healthcare professsional.

Your order will be delivered as soon as the next working day. You can always easily re-order in a couple of clicks. Authored by. Reviewed by. Need something else? We stock treatments for 83 conditions. Search for a condition or treatment. A burning sensation when the cream is applied, increased itchiness when the cream is applied.

Type of medicine, Potent topical corticosteroid. Works by, Reduces inflammation of the skin. Active ingredient, Betamethasone valerate. Strength, %. This is equivalent to % to % of the UK recommended maximum daily dietary intake of g sodium for an adult. Sodium Benzoate. This medicine contains 6mg. This is equivalent to % to % of the UK recommended maximum daily dietary intake of g sodium for an adult. Sodium Benzoate. This medicine contains 6mg. Betamethasone skin treatments are used to treat itching, swollen and irritated skin. They can help with conditions such as eczema, contact dermatitis and. The British Society for Paediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes (BSPED) has developed a Paediatric Steroid Treatment Card which should be issued to children with. Skin gets inflamed when an allergic reaction or irritation causes chemicals to be released in the skin. Child Apply every 1—2 hours until controlled then reduce frequency. Use the lotion on all the irritated skin, not just the worst areas. Visit Yellow Card for further information.

Currently viewing BNF. View all medicinal forms and pricing information. Betamethasone has very high glucocorticoid activity and insignificant mineralocorticoid activity. Rarely, long-term continuous or inappropriate use of topical corticosteroids, particularly those of moderate to high potency, can result in the development of rebound flares, reported as dermatitis with intense redness, stinging, and burning that can spread beyond the initial treatment area.

The MHRA advises that the lowest potency topical corticosteroid needed should be used. For patients who are currently on long-term topical corticosteroid treatment, consider reducing potency or frequency of application or both. The MHRA advises healthcare professionals to report any suspected adverse effects, via the Yellow Card Scheme, even when the adverse affects occur after stopping corticosteroid treatment.

See Corticosteroids, general use. See Adrenal insufficiency. The card includes a management summary for the emergency treatment of adrenal crisis and can be issued by any healthcare professional managing such patients. Avoid live virus vaccines in those receiving immunosuppressive doses serum antibody response diminished ; systemic infection unless specific therapy given. For further information on contra-indications associated with intra-articular, intradermal and intralesional preparations, consult product literature.

Acne; perioral dermatitis; potent corticosteroids in widespread plaque psoriasis; rosacea; untreated bacterial, fungal or viral skin lesions. Avoid after nasal surgery until healing has occurred ; avoid in pulmonary tuberculosis; avoid in the presence of untreated nasal infections; patients transferred from systemic corticosteroids may experience exacerbation of some symptoms. Systemic absorption may follow nasal administration particularly if high doses are used or if treatment is prolonged; therefore also consider the cautions and side-effects of systemic corticosteroids.

The risk of systemic effects may be greater with nasal drops than with nasal sprays; drops are administered incorrectly more often than sprays. Congestive heart failure; diabetes mellitus including a family history of ; diverticulitis; epilepsy; glaucoma including a family history of or susceptibility to ; history of steroid myopathy; history of tuberculosis or X-ray changes frequent monitoring required ; hypertension; hypothyroidism; infection particularly untreated ; long-term use; myasthenia gravis; ocular herpes simplex risk of corneal perforation ; osteoporosis in children ; osteoporosis post-menopausal women and the elderly at risk in adults ; peptic ulcer; psychiatric reactions; recent intestinal anastomoses; recent myocardial infarction rupture reported ; severe affective disorders particularly if history of steroid-induced psychosis ; thromboembolic disorders; ulcerative colitis.

For further information on cautions associated with intra-articular, intradermal and intralesional preparations, consult product literature.

See also Prescribing in the elderly. Avoid prolonged use particularly on the face ; cautions applicable to systemic corticosteroids may also apply if absorption occurs following topical and local use; dermatoses of infancy, including nappy rash extreme caution required—treatment should be limited to 5—7 days in children ; infection; keep away from eyes; use potent or very potent topical corticosteroids under specialist supervision in children ; use potent or very potent topical corticosteroids under specialist supervision in psoriasis can result in rebound relapse, development of generalised pustular psoriasis, and local and systemic toxicity in adults.

Systemic absorption may follow nasal administration particularly if high doses are used or if treatment is prolonged. Therefore also consider the side-effects of systemic corticosteroids.

Anxiety; behaviour abnormal; cataract subcapsular; cognitive impairment; Cushing's syndrome; electrolyte imbalance; fatigue; fluid retention; gastrointestinal discomfort; headache; healing impaired; hirsutism; hypertension; increased risk of infection; menstrual cycle irregularities; mood altered; nausea; osteoporosis; peptic ulcer; psychotic disorder; skin reactions; sleep disorders; weight increased.

Adrenal suppression; alkalosis hypokalaemic; appetite increased; bone fractures; diabetic control impaired; eye disorders; glaucoma; haemorrhage; heart failure; hyperhidrosis; leucocytosis; myopathy; osteonecrosis; pancreatitis; papilloedema; seizure; thromboembolism; tuberculosis reactivation; vertigo; vision blurred.

Chorioretinopathy; growth retardation very common in children ; intracranial pressure increased with papilloedema usually after withdrawal ; telangiectasia. During prolonged therapy with corticosteroids, particularly with systemic use, adrenal atrophy develops and can persist for years after stopping.

Abrupt withdrawal after a prolonged period can lead to acute adrenal insufficiency, hypotension, or death. To compensate for a diminished adrenocortical response caused by prolonged corticosteroid treatment, any significant intercurrent illness, trauma, or surgical procedure requires a temporary increase in corticosteroid dose, or if already stopped, a temporary reintroduction of corticosteroid treatment.

Prolonged courses of corticosteroids increase susceptibility to infections and severity of infections; clinical presentation of infections may also be atypical. Serious infections e. Fungal or viral ocular infections may also be exacerbated. Unless they have had chickenpox, patients receiving oral or parenteral corticosteroids for purposes other than replacement should be regarded as being at risk of severe chickenpox. Manifestations of fulminant illness include pneumonia, hepatitis and disseminated intravascular coagulation; rash is not necessarily a prominent feature.

Passive immunisation with varicella—zoster immunoglobulin is needed for exposed non—immune patients receiving systemic corticosteroids or for those who have used them within the previous 3 months. Confirmed chickenpox warrants specialist care and urgent treatment. Corticosteroids should not be stopped and dosage may need to be increased. Patients taking corticosteroids should be advised to take particular care to avoid exposure to measles and to seek immediate medical advice if exposure occurs.

Prophylaxis with intramuscular normal immunoglobulin may be needed. Systemic corticosteroids, particularly in high doses, are linked to psychiatric reactions including euphoria, insomnia, irritability, mood lability, suicidal thoughts, psychotic reactions, and behavioural disturbances. These reactions frequently subside on reducing the dose or discontinuing the corticosteroid but they may also require specific management.

Patients should be advised to seek medical advice if psychiatric symptoms especially depression and suicidal thoughts occur and they should also be alert to the rare possibility of such reactions during withdrawal of corticosteroid treatment. Systemic corticosteroids should be prescribed with care in those predisposed to psychiatric reactions, including those who have previously suffered corticosteroid—induced psychosis, or who have a personal or family history of psychiatric disorders.

Side-effects applicable to systemic corticosteroids may also apply if absorption occurs following topical and local use. In order to minimise the side-effects of a topical corticosteroid, it is important to apply it thinly to affected areas only, no more frequently than twice daily, and to use the least potent formulation which is fully effective. Hiccups; myocardial rupture following recent myocardial infarction ; oedema; Stevens-Johnson syndrome.

The benefit of treatment with corticosteroids during pregnancy outweighs the risk. Corticosteroid cover is required during labour. Following a review of the data on the safety of systemic corticosteroids used in pregnancy and breast-feeding the CSM May concluded that corticosteroids vary in their ability to cross the placenta but there is no convincing evidence that systemic corticosteroids increase the incidence of congenital abnormalities such as cleft palate or lip.

When administration is prolonged or repeated during pregnancy, systemic corticosteroids increase the risk of intra-uterine growth restriction; there is no evidence of intra-uterine growth restriction following short-term treatment e.

Any adrenal suppression in the neonate following prenatal exposure usually resolves spontaneously after birth and is rarely clinically important. Pregnant women with fluid retention should be monitored closely when given systemic corticosteroids. The height of children receiving prolonged treatment with nasal corticosteroids should be monitored; if growth is slowed, referral to a paediatrician should be considered. The height and weight of children receiving prolonged treatment with corticosteroids should be monitored annually; if growth is slowed, referral to a paediatrician should be considered.

Abrupt withdrawal after a prolonged period can lead to acute adrenal insufficiency, hypotension or death. Withdrawal can also be associated with fever, myalgia, arthralgia, rhinitis, conjunctivitis, painful itchy skin nodules and weight loss.

The magnitude and speed of dose reduction in corticosteroid withdrawal should be determined on a case-by—case basis, taking into consideration the underlying condition that is being treated, and individual patient factors such as the likelihood of relapse and the duration of corticosteroid treatment. Gradual withdrawal of systemic corticosteroids should be considered in those whose disease is unlikely to relapse and have:. Systemic corticosteroids may be stopped abruptly in those whose disease is unlikely to relapse and who have received treatment for 3 weeks or less and who are not included in the patient groups described above.

During corticosteroid withdrawal the dose may be reduced rapidly down to physiological doses equivalent to prednisolone 7. Assessment of the disease may be needed during withdrawal to ensure that relapse does not occur. During corticosteroid withdrawal the dose may be reduced rapidly down to physiological doses equivalent to prednisolone 2—2. Topical corticosteroid preparations should be applied no more frequently than twice daily; once daily is often sufficient.

Topical corticosteroids should be applied in sufficient quantity to cover the affected areas. The length of cream or ointment expelled from a tube may be used to specify the quantity to be applied to a given area of skin. This length can be measured in terms of a fingertip unit the distance from the tip of the adult index finger to the first crease.

Several minutes should elapse between application of topical corticosteroids and emollients. Manufacturer advises cleanse and dry skin prior to plaster application. Plaster may be cut to fit area to be treated. The potency of each topical corticosteroid should be included on the label with the directions for use.

The label should be attached to the container for example, the tube rather than the outer packaging. If systemic absorption occurs following intranasal use, side-effects applicable to systemic corticosteroids may apply. A patient information leaflet should be supplied to every patient when a systemic corticosteroid is prescribed. Patients should especially be advised of potential side-effects including adrenal suppression, immunosuppression, and psychiatric reactions for further details, see Side-effects, further information.

Steroid Treatment Cards should be issued where appropriate to support communication of the risks associated with treatment and to record details of the prescriber, drug, dosage, and duration of treatment.

NHS Trusts can order supplies via the online ordering portal. Steroid Emergency Cards should be issued to patients with adrenal insufficiency and steroid dependence for whom missed doses, illness, or surgery puts them at risk of adrenal crisis. The Royal College of Physicians and the Society for Endocrinology advise that the following patients are considered at risk of adrenal insufficiency and should be given a Steroid Emergency Card:.

If a patient is using topical corticosteroids of different potencies, the patient should be told when to use each corticosteroid. Patients and their carers should be reassured that side effects such as skin thinning and systemic effects rarely occur when topical corticosteroids are used appropriately. If systemic absorption occurs following topical and local use, side-effects applicable to systemic corticosteroids may apply.

Patient counselling is advised for betamethasone cream, ointment, scalp application and foam application. Navigate to section Drug action Indications and dose Unlicensed use Important safety information Contra-indications Cautions Interactions Side-effects Pregnancy Breast feeding Hepatic impairment Renal impairment Monitoring requirements Effect on laboratory tests Treatment cessation Directions for administration Prescribing and dispensing information Patient and carer advice Profession specific information Medicinal forms Related treatment summaries Other drugs in class.

Interactions View interactions for betamethasone. Medicinal forms and pricing There can be variation in the licensing of different medicines containing the same drug. Forms available from special-order manufacturers include: cream, ointment.

Drug action Drug action For betamethasone Betamethasone has very high glucocorticoid activity and insignificant mineralocorticoid activity. Child Apply every 1—2 hours until controlled then reduce frequency. Adult Apply every 1—2 hours until controlled then reduce frequency. Child Apply 1—2 times a day, to be applied thinly. Adult Apply 1—2 times a day, to be applied thinly. Adult Usual dose 0. Adult 4—20 mg, repeated up to 4 times in 24 hours. Child 12—17 years micrograms 4 times a day, to be dissolved in 20 mL water and rinsed around the mouth; not to be swallowed.

Adult micrograms 4 times a day, to be dissolved in 20 mL water and rinsed around the mouth; not to be swallowed. With topical use Betamethasone valerate 0. Betamethasone valerate 0. Betamethasone dipropionate 0. Adult Apply every 24 hours for up to 30 days, wait at least 30 minutes between applications, up to 6 medicated plasters may be used per day. Adult Apply 2—3 drops 2—3 times a day, dose to be applied into each nostril.



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